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Illustration of gender pay gap

Queensland’s gender pay gap down to 13.4% in 2023

Progress report highlights economic disparities, superannuation gaps, and government initiatives to address gender inequality

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Women are more likely to be engaged in casual employment.
The government is also investing in programs aimed at empowering and supporting women.
Half of the 66,300 Queenslanders who have enrolled in Free TAFE programs are female.

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In 2023, Queensland saw a reduction in the gender pay gap, which narrowed to 13.4%, as revealed by the state’s 2023 Gender Equality Report Cards.

This indicates that over the past year, women earned an average of $1,637.80 for a full-time working week, compared to men who earned $1,891.10 during the same period.

The data reflects a continued trend of narrowing pay gaps in Queensland, following a reduction to 15.6% in 2022 from the previous 15.8% in 2021.

“While inequalities persist, the Miles Government is making strides in closing the economic disparities between genders,” stated Shannon Fentiman, Queensland’s Minister for Health and Minister for Women, in an official statement.

Additionally, the report highlighted progress in addressing superannuation gaps, although women across all age groups still tend to have lower superannuation balances than men.

Among those aged 60 to 64 years, females had an average superannuation account balance of $302,635, compared to $376,603 for males.

The report also underscored that women are more likely to be engaged in casual employment, with 25.5% of female employees in casual positions, compared to 21.5% of male employees.

25.5% of female employees in casual positions, compared to 21.5% of male employees

Furthermore, women are predominantly represented in clerical and administrative roles, constituting 76.3% of the workforce, while being underrepresented in fields such as machinery operation and technical trades.

Fentiman emphasized the government’s dedication to fostering a safer and more prosperous future for women and girls. However, she acknowledged that significant work remains to be done.

“We recognize there’s still much ground to cover,” Fentiman remarked. “That’s why we’re enhancing our laws to provide better protection for women and hold perpetrators accountable.”

The government is also investing in programs aimed at empowering and supporting women to enhance their skills, pursue leadership roles, and enter traditionally male-dominated industries.

“More than half of the 66,300 Queenslanders who have enrolled in Free TAFE programs are female,” Fentiman noted. “And we will persist in encouraging more women to explore opportunities in sectors like manufacturing, energy, and STEM.”

The 2023 Gender Equality Report Cards offer insights into the status of women in Queensland across various domains, including employment, leadership, safety, health, and well-being. Released alongside the Annual Queensland Women’s Statement 2024, these documents outline the government’s accomplishments and future steps toward achieving gender equality.

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