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Employment

What does HR want from the incoming New Zealand government?

Parties unveil employment policies, highlighting controversial proposals.

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National is aligned with the idea of bringing back 90-day trials.
The party has suggested eliminating the January 2 public holiday.
National aims to eliminate the Reserve Bank’s focus on maximising employment.

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We’d be keen to see the next government review immigration settings

As the nation eagerly anticipates the formation of a new government amid ongoing coalition talks, the three negotiating parties have outlined various employment-related policies unveiled during the election campaign.

Act has been outspokenly critical of the current personal grievance process, advocating for restrictions on remedies for employees and proposing a one-month timeframe for all Employment Relations Authority (ERA) determinations. Additionally, they seek to prevent contractors from challenging their employment status in the Employment Court. In a distinctive move, the party has suggested eliminating the January 2 public holiday to alleviate Matariki-related costs for small businesses and is pushing for the reinstatement of 90-day trials.

National is aligned with the idea of bringing back 90-day trials, emphasizing flexibility for employers, and aiming to facilitate simultaneous paid leave for parents.

As the nation eagerly anticipates the formation of a new government amid ongoing coalition talks, the three negotiating parties have outlined various employment-related policies unveiled during the election campaign

Concerning wages and pay, Act proposes a reduction in government KiwiSaver contributions, advocating for tax cuts, and proposing a cap on contributions at 5% of a person’s taxable income. National plans to adjust income tax brackets for inflation, a sentiment shared by NZ First. Additionally, NZ First proposes making the first $14,000 of income tax-free.

Regarding job creation, National aims to eliminate the Reserve Bank’s focus on maximizing employment, while Act focuses on reducing the number of public servants and limiting pay increases until frontline staff receive raises. NZ First supports training more police officers and continuing support for the Jobs For Nature program.

In the realm of human resources (HR), leaders are primarily concerned with the immigration policies of the incoming government, given the persistent talent shortage in certain sectors. HR leaders, such as Sarah Able from The Cooperative Bank and Amie Amosa from Hammerforce, emphasize the need for a comprehensive review of immigration settings to attract workers with diverse skills. They stress the importance of a talent retention policy for key industries in New Zealand and underscore the need for a clear value proposition for the international talent market, both in the short and long term.

Amosa highlights the significance of recognizing the transferable value of international skills to the local workforce and urges New Zealand to attract skilled Kiwis abroad to return home with their expertise. However, the effectiveness of any new policies, according to Amosa, relies on establishing a robust foundation for the country’s economic landscape.

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